Harry Potter thoughts

The sound of Jim Dale’s voice coming through your window as your neighbor sits in their car, listening to a Harry Potter audiobook. Book 6, I think?

Harry Potter thoughts

Queen of Blood Thoughts

Loved Tamora Pierce growing up, her Tortall books had everything that I needed–strong female characters, magic, adventure, and romance.

So you better believe when Tamora Pierce blurbs a book and says “Thrilling–heartrending–enchanting–absolutely un-put-down-able!” then I’m all over it.

Happily reading The Queen of Blood. 

 

The Queen of Blood

Queen of Blood Thoughts

YA Book Thoughts

  • The Black Witch, a YA novel set in a misogynistic and racist society with an unlikeable main character, has received a ton of controversy. Today, I read the Vulture piece about the backlash but I still need to read the original criticism that was the rallying cry for the book’s critics. I’m fascinated by the whole thing, the book’s author has really hit a nerve here and the reaction has shown the power and limitations of social media when it comes to literary criticism.
  • Finished reading The Diabolic by S.J. Kincaid about a genetically modified humanoid named Nemesis, a killing machine that looks like a teenaged girl. The author has described the book as I, Claudius set in space, and I can definitely see the merit in that. Reminded me a lot of Red Rising with the revolution plot against an oppressive society and government, the main character’s attempts at concealing their true nature, and the court intrigue of a decadent society with violence ready to erupt from beneath its shallow surface. The books would be interesting to compare side-by-side because of gender swapping of the characters and how they handle certain situations. Both are satisfying and made me want to beat my chest, gather comrades, and overthrow something.
  • Went to the library today and walked away with:
    • Ramona Blue by Julie Murphy (author of Dumplin’)
    • Eliza and Her Monsters by Francesca Zappia
    • Three Dark Crowns by Kendare Blake
YA Book Thoughts

Short Reviews, Quick Takes

Screen Shot 2016-01-17 at 3.34.27 PMScreen Shot 2016-01-17 at 3.54.23 PMScreen Shot 2016-01-17 at 4.04.03 PM

 

In The Visitors Lucy is recovering from a typhoid fever in Egypt with her American governess at her side. She is listless and unable to focus on the living until she meets and befriends Frances Winlock whose father is an archaeologist. Soon she becomes part of a crowd which includes Howard Carter, Lord Carnavon, and others who discover King Tut’s tomb. This discovery mold’s Lucy’s life.

A bleak book crowded with historical figures and events. The discovery takes place in the 1920s, but the book dwells in the disastrous events afterwards and follows Lucy to her old-age. There are so many disasters and ghosts. Beauman appears to be grieving for an age of exploration and adventure that is long past. I couldn’t help but wish that this book had more joy in it and less history.

Continue reading “Short Reviews, Quick Takes”

Short Reviews, Quick Takes

Trouble is a Friend of Mine by Stephanie Tromly

Screen Shot 2016-01-10 at 11.19.14 AM

Digby is trouble with a capital ‘T.’ Ever since his sister disappeared, he has been obsessed with solving the mystery even if it means breaking the law. When another girl goes missing in River Heights he’s convinced that the two disappearances are related and goes on a reckless, hilarious, and dangerous quest to solve the case.

Continue reading “Trouble is a Friend of Mine by Stephanie Tromly”

Trouble is a Friend of Mine by Stephanie Tromly

Unspoken by Sarah Rees Brennan

Screen Shot 2016-01-06 at 8.23.23 PM

There is too much banter in a lot of young adult fiction. I blame Joss Whedon. Brennan has to be a Buffy fan, you can tell it with the pointless jokes during crises, conversations that go nowhere and a group of friends who might as well be the Scooby gang.

I liked Buffy, but so many people are trying to write this way that some are bound to fail.

So. Much. Banter.

Continue reading “Unspoken by Sarah Rees Brennan”

Unspoken by Sarah Rees Brennan